Autism Reality

A Fredericton Autism Father Thanks MP Andy Scott

Brian Rimpilainen is a Fredericton father of an autistic child who has been a hard working advocate on behalf of autistic persons in New Brunswick and Canada. In this letter Brian offers his appreciation to Fredericton MP Andy Scott who steered a private member’s motion through the House of Commons calling for a national autism strategy.


To MP Andy Scott and his staff, I offer my sincere thanks for all the work that has been done to raise the awareness of autism at the federal level.

I was very proud to be in attendance for the second hour of debate for motion 172. I had to wipe my teary eyes as I shared in the frustrations of other parents across Canada. I hope that the Liberal Caucus will continue in support of Andy Scott’s efforts and move the issue forward.

It does indeed look as though there will be a new federal election in the future. I hope that autism will be raised for election debate. While M-172 passed with support from both sides of the House, Bill C-304 (introduced by the MP for Charlottetown) did not. This was a disappointing outcome, considering that all Members now know of the importance and urgency of a national autism strategy.

It is to my understanding that Scott will not be running in the next election. My best wishes to his family and future endeavours.

BRIAN RIMPILAINEN

Fredericton

March 31, 2007 Posted by | Andy Scott, autism disorder, Fredericton, national autism strategy | Leave a comment

Japanese Study Finds No MMR Autism Connection

Evidence to support a connection between the MMR vaccine and incidents of autism is hard to come by. An epidemiological study in Japan found no connection. Tokio Uchiyama, Michiko Kurosawa and Yutaka Inaba, in a July 2006 study, found no evidence to support a causal relationship between the MMR and autism:

Abstract It has been suggested that the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) is a cause of regressive autism. As MMR was used in Japan only between 1989 and 1993, this time period affords a natural experiment to examine this hypothesis. Data on 904 patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were analyzed. During the period of MMR usage no significant difference was found in the incidence of regression between MMR-vaccinated children and non-vaccinated children. Among the proportion and incidence of regression across the three MMR-program-related periods (before, during and after MMR usage), no significant difference was found between those who had received MMR and those who had not. Moreover, the incidence of regression did not change significantly across the three periods.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/aq0470t874jwm686/

March 31, 2007 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment