Autism Reality

Autism Crisis – Australia


ABC is reporting on an Australian study which indicates that autism is costing Australia [ Population 20,823,333, May 14 07, Australian Bureau of Statistics] up to $7 billion a year; a reflection of a 10 fold increase in rates of Autism and Aspergers. Dr. James Morton of Autism Early Intervention Outcomes Unit says the problem has caught government unawares. Apparently the Australian government is as oblivious to the realities of autism as the Canadian government. Maybe Roy Grinker, Kristina Chew and others can offer some soothing anthropological perspective and some new literary metaphors to assist the Australian families who are struggling to help their autistic children acquire basic language and life skills.

http://tinyurl.com/38l6b

span style=”font-weight:bold;”>Autism costing Aust up to $7b: report

A new report has found the treatment of autism and related conditions such as Asperger syndrome are costing the Australian economy up to $7 billion a year.

It was commissioned by Dr James Morton, one of the founders of the Autism Early Intervention Outcomes Unit.

Dr Morton says the report’s release in Brisbane today has been timed to mark the start of Autism Awareness Week.

“It’s really gone under the radar. It’s exploded in the last 10 years. Some of the studies suggests that the incidence has increased 10-fold in the last decade,” he said.

“I think that is why it’s caught government unawares. It wasn’t anywhere near the problem it is now 10 years ago.”

Dr Morton says the official response to the rising incidence of autism has been too little, too late.

“I hope that this study brings [autism] to the community’s attention and leads to funding for early detection and early intervention, which makes an enormous difference and is very under-funded in this country,” he said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200705/s1921975.htm

May 14, 2007 Posted by | Australia, autism awareness, autism crisis, autism disorder, Autism Early Intervention Outcomes Unit, Autism Society Canada, Dr. James Morton, Kristina Chew, Roy Grinker | 2 Comments

Autism & ABA – "Life Just Keeps Getting Better" for Jack Fraser


Dealing with it … autism sufferer Jack Fraser enjoys time with his mum Charmaine. / The Daily Telegraph

In “Autism epidemic being ignored” Sunday Telegraph, May 12, 2007, Zoe Taylor describes the autism epidemic in Australia where a recent federal government-funded review of research into autism concluded there was scientific evidence of the effectiveness of therapies including applied behaviour analysis – which draws on research dating back more than 40 years. Despite knowledge in Australia of the efficacy of ABA as an autism intervention the treatment remains underfunded, good news for those who view autism as a “joy” but bad news for families struggling to cope with the realities of autism, families trying to help their autistic children. Amongst the hardship though are stories such as those of Jack Fraser, a young autistic boy whose family has done whatever was necessary to fund ABA treatment for him, with great results for Jack.


Charmaine and Anthony Fraser had to move from Newcastle to Sydney and cash in their Super twice in order to fund ABA therapy for their son five-year-old son Jack.

The couple, from Wollstonecraft, face annual bills of around $60,000 for the treatment which includes one-on-one home therapy sessions every weekday morning and afternoon.

They have seen vast improvements in Jack, but he is unlikely to be able to attend a mainstream school so they are considering sending him to a specialist private school.

Mrs Fraser said she had no regrets about funding the therapy, but was angry there was no Government help.

She added: “When Jack was diagnosed we were devastated at that thought of what life might be like for him. Now he can talk. ABA is hard work, but it has opened up a whole range of opportunities for him. Life just keeps getting better.”

http://www.news.com.au/sundaytelegraph/story/0,,21713139-5006007,00.html

May 12, 2007 Posted by | aba, applied behaviour analysis, Australia, autism disorder, autism treatment | 1 Comment