Autism Reality

UK Study Confirms ABA As Most Effective Intervention for Autism

A UK Study has confirmed, again , that Applied Behavior Analysis, ABA, is the most effective intervention method for children with autism. The study was a comparative study of different teaching interventions for children with autism in a community setting and looked at the effectiveness of the interventions on children’s intellectual, educational, adaptive behavioral functioning and family stress levels. As reported on News-Medical.Net, Children supported by Applied Behaviour Analytic (ABA) programmes made greater intellectual and educational gains than children in other intervention programmes, while Special Nursery programmes also produced gains, compared to other less time-intensive programmes. Ideological opponents of ABA , some of whom actually oppose treating or curing autism, will not be convinced but parents seeking to help their autistic children enjoy a better quality of life should understand that this recent study is preceded by hundreds of other studies demonstrating that ABA is an effective way to help their children enjoy a better quality of life.

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=25877

June 4, 2007 Posted by | Applied Behavior Analysis, autism, education | 2 Comments

Autism Spectrum Disorder and ABA – Living With Autism





Lexi Cota’s tutor, Sara English, coaxes her to repeat an “mmm” sound for a spoon of frosting.
(Journal Photo by Lauren Carroll)

The Winston-Salem Journal has done some excellent work on autism with this article and video Living With Autism. The article, interactive graphic and video do an excellent job of presenting the realities of life for an autitsic child and her family. It is done with a positive, but realistic, presentation of the challenges facing autistic children. And it cuts to the chase in telling parents of autistic children what they need to know. ABA based early intervention is critically important for your child’s future. These pieces also present very well the challenges faced by parents in trying to educate their children including the inadequacies of the formal education system in helping educate autistic children.

The Gordons suspected that Ross had autism when he was 6 months old, said Kristi Gordon, his mother. He never responded to people or toys, and could spend hours spinning things.

The diagnosis was confirmed a year later.

“No matter how much we thought it, it still kind of crushed us,” she said.

Others, like the Cotas, watch their seemingly typical child change into someone they don’t recognize. When she was a year old, Lexi was a charming, typical toddler, one who loved to pop out from behind doorways and say “hi!” Then, when she was about 16 months old, she began to change. She became at turns silent and withdrawn or unruly, running around and flapping her arms wildly. She was diagnosed with autism a few weeks before her third birthday.

No matter when they get the diagnosis, the message that goes with it is the same: Get help now.

Many experts say that children who are placed into therapy as soon as possible have the best chance of eventually living a relatively independent life in which they will be able to have a job, even if their social mannerisms are unconventional.

“When you see them young, and 11/2, 2 and 3, you have no way of knowing which child will respond well to intervention and which won’t. The idea is you provide intervention and treatment when they’re young,” said Dr. Kurt Klinepeter, an associate professor of pediatrics at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and the medical director of Amos Cottage. Amos Cottage is affiliated with Wake Forest and offers services for children with developmental problems.

It’s difficult to tell how many children have other conditions that co-exist with the autism. About 30 percent of autistic children will have IQ scores in the normal range. Those children will have the best chance at eventually living independently, with jobs and typical lives – not just because they score well, but also because they have to be on the higher-functioning end of the autism spectrum to be able to take an IQ test at all, Klinepeter said.

The other 70 percent aren’t necessarily mentally retarded, he said. They could be more affected by the communication and social aspects of the disorder, which would make it nearly impossible to correctly administer an IQ test.

Children who are suspected of having autism usually end up at the county’s early-intervention program, either through a referral from a doctor or day-care worker, or because the parent is concerned enough to want an evaluation.

If the child is autistic, the county is in charge of providing therapy until the child turns 3, through the Children’s Development Service Agencies. Children can receive a combination of speech, occupational and physical therapies. Some also receive therapy through the ABC of NC center. It is paid for by Children’s Development Service Agencies.

Many parents want their children to receive Applied Behavior Analysis. The National Institute of Mental Health, the leading federal agency for research on mental and behavioral disorders, said that ABA has “become widely accepted as an effective treatment” in its booklet about autism. ABA is the only treatment specifically mentioned in the booklet.

http://tinyurl.com/2h5uqz

http://extras.journalnow.com/multimedia/2007/autism/autism2.wmv

http://extras.journalnow.com/multimedia/2007/autism/autism.html

May 29, 2007 Posted by | aba, Applied Behavior Analysis, autism spectrum disorders, early intervention, education | Leave a comment

Autism challenging for all

Autism challenging for all

Parents happy with province’s support, but want more.

By Tony Kiritsis

Published Thursday May 24th, 2007

Standing tall atop the jungle gym almost eye level with his father Todd, Ryan Downey paces back and forth with a smile on his face that comes and goes. Perhaps he’s unaware of the barking dogs running in the unkempt field behind him, their owner calling out commands. Or perhaps he doesn’t care, more concerned about how he will get down.

Just by looking at Ryan as he cautiously approaches the slide, toward Todd’s coaxing voice, it’s as if there’s nothing wrong. But, behind his blue eyes there’s something different about him and unlike other four-year olds his age, he can’t talk. If he could, he would probably tell you exactly what’s wrong.

Instead, he will pace around the room, his hands sometimes flapping, offering the impression he’s trying to master a one-handed clap.

At other times he rocks back and forth, his teeth biting down, slowly tearing a hole into the top right-hand shoulder of his shirt. Or he screams and cries because he’s scared and frustrated and needs to be heard.

Somewhere, in another part of the city, another lost voice is that of 22-year-old Christopher Hammel.

This docile individual can look intimidating when standing, towering at over six-feet tall. His expressionless stare can be mistaken for a look of displeasure, until he approaches you, raises his powerful hands and pats you on the shoulder.

Seated across from Christopher is his voice; his mother Karen. Like Ryan, Christopher is non-verbal. His frustration and pleasure reveal themselves through grunts, noises and the use of body language.

Ryan Downey and Christopher Hammel are only two of the multitude of children and adults in Canada who suffer from one of the many forms of autism. Autistic children face daily struggles well into adulthood, while their families fight on their behalf to provide the best possible life for their autistic children.

In Canada, roughly 1/165 people aged 0-19 have an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Adequate funding for services and the need to properly educate these children early in life are only two of the challenges that parents and the systems in place face.

“We thought it was the end of the world,” says Todd, when he and Tamara discovered Ryan was autistic.

Parents of autistic children face daily struggles that often leave them worn out. Not only must they contend with the emotional trauma, but also the financial instability.

“When your child is autistic it’s a fight you’re in for life. Some people do give up and I don’t criticize them,” says Harold Doherty, a local lawyer and autism activist.

Doherty has been fighting for better services on the part of his family, and others in the community.

Karen Hammel says she understands the strain that’s placed on the family. When she had Christopher diagnosed at the IWK Hospital in Halifax in 1986, doctors there told her she should institutionalize her son. Since then, she’s placed his needs first.

“We don’t eat out, we don’t go to movies,” says Karen. “House repairs haven’t been taken care of. We just go without things that most people don’t go without.”

Like many parents of children with disorders Todd and Tamara were in denial about Ryan’s condition. They blamed themselves for something they thought they could have prevented, when in fact they were doing everything they knew.

“We were pissed at ourselves for not picking up on it,” says Todd. “It was as if we failed as parents.” Autism is a disorder with one face but wearing multiple masks to conceal its identity.

Considered a spectrum disorder, those diagnosed fall upon a scale and are assessed based on the severity of their symptoms.

Children born with an ASD tend to avoid social interaction with other people. They lack communication skills and engage in excessive repetitive stereotypical behaviours called stimming.

Since the diagnosis the Downey’s have found support in Fredericton’s autistic community through the Autism Society of New Brunswick and Autism Intervention Services, a local centre where Ryan receives therapy.

It’s here, amidst the maze of cubicles that reminds one of an office building, where behind the grey dividers you would expect to find a middle-aged man hunched over a computer busy typing, pictures of his wife and kids pinned to the board above his desk.

Yet there are no desks, nor are there any middle-aged men hard at work behind those dividers. But there are kids back there, kids like Ryan.

Child psychologist Paul McDonnell, who diagnosed Ryan, says that therapy is by no means a cure, because the word cure demotes an absolute result. Instead, McDonnell says people will say this child will become indistinguishable from other children.

When the centre’s current location opened in May of 2006, program director Danielle Pelletier says they only anticipated 30 children but now have over 50 children receiving treatment.

Since most children are diagnosed after the age of two, it allows them three to four years of provincially funded therapy. The key to helping children with an ASD is to intervene early.

The centre practices applied behavioural analysis therapy (ABA), a repetitive process by which tasks are broken down into smaller steps. As the child learns each step he can combine them into one complete task.

In New Brunswick, pre-school aged children receive 20 hours of government funded therapy each week through the Department of Family and Community Services. Other Canadian provinces like Alberta will fund autistic children until they reach 18.

“It pretty much seems that 20 hours a week is rock bottom,” Dr. McDonnell says. “Research pretty consistently shows that over 25 hours and especially over 30 hours, will give you much better results.” Sheila Bulmer, provincial program advisor with the Early Childhood and School Based Services Branch with Family and Community Services says, “We came up with 20 hours, and obviously that’s at the lower end, but the other monies and services that children can tap into is what we call integrated daycare.” Bulmer says parent involvement at home also contributes to the child’s therapy and learning.

Although parents will do all they can to provide extra therapy and learning for their children, the bottom line is they aren’t trained therapists.

“It turns out New Brunswick is a good place to be if your child has autism, especially the Fredericton area,” says Todd. “We’ve seen serious improvement and that makes us happy.” The therapy Ryan and other children his age receive may be adequate, but more could always be done.

“You do the intensive intervention up front because that’s where you’re guaranteed to get the most improvement and the most change,” Bulmer says.

The money the Downey’s receive goes directly to Autism Intervention Services to cover an array of costs including the therapy. Yet all this money is still not enough.

Hundreds of dollars are spent on new toys for new therapies and because Ryan requires around the clock supervision, Todd has become his primary caregiver giving up his career.

“We’ve already cashed in some retirement money to help him and we’ll probably have to cash more,” says Tamara.

Early intervention is meant to aid autistic children in order they be integrated into society with the hope that someday, they will be able to live semi-independent lives.

“I’m most worried about the school system,” Todd says. “I think he’s going to be ready for school, but is the school going to be ready for him?”

Harold Doherty believes the system isn’t prepared to handle these students and changes need to be made. “The system says teachers teach and that’s it.”

Each year approximately 40-50 new students with ASD will enter the English sector school system in New Brunswick. This number is high considering last year, roughly 24 students with an autism spectrum disorder graduated or phased out of the system at age 21.

With nine Anglophone and five Francophone districts, the English and French sectors combined have approximately 900 students with ASD from kindergarten to grade 12 province wide.

Stephanie Allen-Holt, a learning specialist with the Department of Education for students with autism spectrum disorder, says over the last two years her department has been trying to increase the capacity for specialists that can work specifically and directly with autistic children.

Allen-Holt says one of the recommendations from the Liberal platform was to train teacher assistants through the University of New Brunswick’s College of Extended Learning with autism support worker training. This called for 100 trained teacher assistants each year over four years.

“What’s the cost going to be when you have a child that’s not appropriately educated? You’re putting money into teaching them pre-school and when they go to school, if that support isn’t continued, there’s actually the chance some kids could digress,” Tamara says.

New Brunswick’s Minister of Education, Kelly Lamrock says his department will begin the training as soon as possible.

“If it’s at all possible to do in September, we will, trust me. That will be the first spending order I give for the new budget year,” says Lamrock.

As parents like the Downeys fight for their son’s well-being, the outcome is to provide a better quality of life for the future. For parents like Karen this is now the fight.

“The cost down the road is immense for the government if they want to look at cost and numbers and dollars. To take care of someone who can’t independently, or somewhat independently function and become a part of society, that cost is huge. Pay now, or pay a lot later,” Tamara says.

Karen has fought to give Christopher similar if not equal opportunities in life, but says while society is accepting and including, they aren’t integrating. She has taken it upon herself to integrate her son into society.

Two afternoons every week, Christopher walks through the glass paneled doors at the Greco on Dundonald Street in Fredericton, to the greetings of fellow employees. He comes to build boxes that will end up at doors of residents in the city.

As his strong hands gently assemble the malleable puzzle like cardboard cut-out pieces, the ability to hold down a job shows with enough help, there may be nothing he can’t achieve.

“For older individuals the need is proper residential care,” says Doherty. “Unless you can care for your child, you have to place them in a group home.”

Karen has no inclination of placing her son in a home any time soon if she can help it. Parents like the Downeys hope one day they will not have to make that choice.

“Someday it would be nice if adults with autism had some type of program that would be available to them and their families,” says Pelletier. While Family and Community Services’ long-term care plan provides Christopher with a care worker and a disability pension, it’s still not enough.

“I’m currently fighting to get clinical supervision covered,” Karen says. The cost for this service is approximately $10,000 a year.

As it stands, the Department of Family and Community Services and the Department of Health and Wellness won’t cover clinical supervision because it’s considered an indirect service.

Exhausting all her governmental avenues, if a resolution isn’t achieved, Karen feels she has no alternative but to file a human rights complaint, as she believes her son is being discriminated against.

The Downey’s have wrestled and settled with a lot in a short period of time, even though they’re in the early stages of the fight for Ryan’s future.

“We’ve come to terms that this is how it’s going to be,” Todd says. “I’ve come to terms that I’m probably not going to have a career. We’ve come to terms that we aren’t having another child.”

The intervention Ryan began months ago has yielded an improvement . He has begun to interact with other children at the centre and is able to be in public spaces like the mall with minimal incidents.

Karen knows she will always be fighting for Christopher. One day she won’t be able to take care of him anymore and wonders what will happen to him in the future.

“No matter what it is you’re looking for, you always just have to keep repeating and repeating it to the government. After a while…you feel so beaten down,” Karen says.

The future for children like Ryan appears optimistic. Programs and services to aid autistic children in their youth have improved, but have a long way to go.

The future for adults like Christopher would be bleak, if it weren’t for the determination of parents like Karen, who are currently laying the groundwork for the next generation.

http://www.canadaeast.com/ce2/hereroot/index.php?paper=here

May 25, 2007 Posted by | aba, adult care, autism, Autism Connections Fredericton, Autism Society New Brunswick, education, Paul McDonnell, UNB-CEL Autism Intervention Training Program | Leave a comment

ABA Based Autism Pre-School Program Successful in Manilus New York

Parents in Onondaga County New York are pleased with their children’s progress in an ABA based pre-school program for autistic children. Applied Behavior Analysis has been subjected to hundreds of academic studies, and anecdotal reports, that indicate substantial gains for autistic children but still detractors look for some way to discredit ABA. Every success story like this one in Onondaga County New York makes it harder for those detractors to make their case.

http://www.9wsyr.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=c2c6a3a3-71eb-4984-8091-25c25afa94cd


Success with New Pre-K Autism Program

Last Update: Feb 7, 2007 7:59 PM

Manlius (WSYR-TV) – A new program, geared toward helping children with autism, is getting off the ground in Onondaga County.

Called Enable, and it’s offered at a pre-school in Manlius.

Zachary Freeman looks like your typical 3 ½ year old. About a year ago, he was diagnosed with autism.

Zachary’s mom, Janie, says her son has a hard time communicating and is nervous around other children. But since he started pre-school at shining stars daycare, he’s come out of his shell.

“In the last month, I’ve noticed more joint attention, more spontaneous language, more interaction with his brother and us and it’s really wonderful. We’re thrilled,” she says.

Zachary’s learning thanks to a special curriculum called applied behavior analysis, or ABA. It works to improve skills and behaviors in autistic children through a very structured learning environment.

Education Director Phil Grajko says, “Our job is to take that methodology, do it as intensely as we can in the 2 to 3 years that we have children so that they’re successful in a typical kindergarten classroom.”

To most people, this looks like a shopping cart full of toys, but here it’s a shopping cart full of tools used to teach special needs children how to communicate.

Zachary spends five hours each weekday at the center. Thanks to county and state funding, it doesn’t cost a thing.

Janie Freeman says, “They have one in Rome and Cortland, but we didn’t feel that comfortable putting him on a bus that far, so we’re thrilled this opened up.”

This is something they’ve wanted since Zachary was diagnosed. He’ll stay here until he’s 5 and then hopefully start kindergarten somewhere else with other kids his own age.

The classroom is full now and there’s a waiting list. The school is applying for more state aid so it can hopefully expand the program next year.

February 7, 2007 Posted by | aba, Applied Behavior Analysis, autism, education | Leave a comment

The Joy of Conor




Because finding joy in Conor does not require struggle; Because the point is he is Conor, he is not his Autism; Because he does not comprehend what Autism is and can not offer his opinion about autism; Because Conor is a joy but his Autism is not; Because he rises in the morning and greets his family with a smile; Because he waits, faced pressed against the window, for his Dad every day and lifts his Dad’s spirits every day; Because despite his intellectual, communication and behavior problems he is worth it; Because, like any other child, he deserves to be educated to the fullest extent possible and to learn in the way that he learns best; Because it takes hard work and sacrifice, not accepting or singing the praises of Autism, a serious and debilitating disorder, to ensure Conor learns and develops to the best of his ability; Because the tremendous joy that he brings me every single day does not arise from his autism it arises from who he is and his Autism, a serious developmental disorder, will not be given credit for that great joy he shares with us every day.

January 28, 2007 Posted by | autism disorder, Conor, education, family, joy | 7 Comments

Progress and Challenges in the Behavioral Treatment of Autism

The Association for Behavior Analysis is sponsoring an Autism Conference in Boston next week with an excellent roster of speakers and topics on Behavioral Treatment in Autism. With so many myths and misconceptions about ABA and autism it looks like this conference could be very helpful for parents looking for professional guidance on how to improve conditions for their autistic children. The introduction for the conference program follows but the detailed list of speakers and topics can be found by accessing the ABA International web site at:

http://www.abainternational.org/autconf/downloads/Program_posters.pdf

Progress and Challenges in the Behavioral Treatment of Autism
Association for Behavior Analysis February 2 – 4, 2007 Boston Sheraton; Boston, MA

The diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in a child presents tremendous challenges for parents and educators. For several decades applied behavior analysis has provided the conceptual and empirical bases for designing and evaluating effective education and treatment programs for children with autism. It has been estimated that more than 550 articles have been published in the peer-reviewed literature reporting socially significant improvements in communication skills, social skills, academic skills, and adaptive functioning by children with autism as a result of behaviorally-based interventions. As the beneficial outcomes of behaviorally-based education and treatment have been reported by the media, the number of agencies and individuals offering “ABA services” for children with autism has grown exponentially. Inaccuracies and misconceptions in the popular media and in the professional literature about what applied behavior analysis is or is not and what it can or cannot achieve make it difficult for consumers and practitioners alike to separate fact from fiction.

In response to this situation, The Association for Behavior Analysis International is sponsoring the 2007 Autism Conference, Progress and Challenges in the Behavioral Treatment of Autism, to be held at the Sheraton Hotel in Boston on February 2-4, 2007. Planned with the support of ABA International’s Autism and Parent Professional Partnership Special Interest Groups, this conference will expose providers of home and school-based behavior analysis services, parents and family members, caregivers, researchers, teacher trainers, and students to the most current, scientifically validated information about behavior analysis in autism treatment.

The single-track conference will feature 14 invited presentations by prominent researchers and authorities on the treatment of autism and representatives from the May Institute and the New England Center for Children (past SABA Awardees for Enduring Programmatic Contributions to Behavior Analysis). The conference will also provide a forum for over 170 autism researchers to share their recent work in two poster sessions. The conference will close with a Round Table discussion by representatives of ABA International’s organizational members. The conference will provide many opportunities for personal exchange with researchers, presenters, and organizational members of ABA International.

January 26, 2007 Posted by | aba, autism, autism disorder, education, evidence based, scientific, treatment | Leave a comment

School Inclusion Can Be Abuse

School inclusion ‘can be abuse’. That is the title of a BBC on line story which includes a report on a recent study of the British inclusive education system prepared for that country’s National Union of Teachers “The Costs of Inclusion” by John MacBeath, Maurice Galton, Susan Steward, Andrea MacBeath and Charlotte Page, published by University of Cambridge Faculty of Education. Professor John MacBeath of Cambridge was interviewed and stated that placing some students in a mainstream classroom could be seen as a form of abuse:

Physically sitting in a classroom is not inclusion. Children can be excluded by sitting in a classroom that’s not meeting their needs.” The typical secondary school timetable – rushing from physics, to history then French, say – was for some children as bewildering as being “on another planet”. “You might call it a form of abuse, in a sense, that those children are in a situation that’s totally inappropriate for them.” Professor MacBeath also indicated that the report is not “anti-inclusion” , just that mainstream classroom inclusion is not appropriate for all students, particularly those with complex needs.

The BBC story and the “Costs of Inclusion” report can be found at:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/4774407.stm

http://www.teachers.org.uk/resources/pdf/CostsofInclusion.pdf

I have personally argued against placement of all autistic children in mainstream classrooms as has the Autism Society New Brunswick which asks that the school system look at what works for each individual child. If a child does not learn in, and is overwhelmed by, a mainstream classroom then he or she should not be placed in that environment. A quieter environment is necessary for some autistic children who also require more individualized instruction. Flexibility in choice of learning environment is needed. Some autistic children are capable of learning in a mainstream classroom. Some are not. It is critically necessary to examine the evidence and see what works for the individual child. Failure to place an autistic child in the right learning environment because of a rigid adherence to the philosophy of mainstream classroom inclusion for all may constitute abuse.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/4774407.stm

January 16, 2007 Posted by | autism, autism education, education, evidence based, inclusion, philosophy | 3 Comments

Please Honor Premier Graham’s Autism Training Commitment

January 14 2007

Hon. Victor Boudreau
Minister of Finance

Dear Hon. Minister Boudreau:

I am writing to ask that you honor the commitment made by now Premier Shawn Graham during the recent election campaign during which time he promised to provide training for 100 Teachers’ Aides and Resource Teachers per year for the next four years at the UNB-CEL Autism Intervention Training program. The fulfillment of this promise is of vital importance to the education of autistic children. These children are not receiving the “cadillac treatment” in New Brunswick schools right now. Far from it.

For many autistic students fulfillment of Premier Graham’s promise will mean the difference between staying in school and not being sent home because teachers, aides, and other professionals did not understand their behavior and the conditions in the schools which can seriously disrupt environmentally sensitive and communication challenged children. For a great many others it will mean the difference between receiving a real education and simply being babysat as a false testament to New Brunswick’s inclusive education system. Teachers can not commit the time and attention needed to educate autistic children properly and instruct the rest of the class. Most autistic students need TA’s for safety reasons. It makes no sense whatsoever not to provide autism trained TA’s to assist them in learning. The UNB-CEL program is top notch and offers training in autism and the methods that work in educating autistic children.

My profoundly autistic son is almost eleven years of age. The previous government dragged out the Interdepartmental Committee Report on autism services for two years before issuing a report in 2001. The report went unread for another year by the lead minister charged with the autism portfolio. Most of its recommendations remain unfulfilled. My son is growing older. He has had properly trained TA’s for two of his six school years but even now with an excellent well trained TA she is not permitted to spend the full day with him and there is no one to replace her when she is absent for personal reasons. Many autistic students have TA’s with no autism specific training or no TA at all.

Do not underestimate the importance of the Premier’s commitment to train TA’s and Resource teachers to work with our autistic children Mr. Boudreau. They have lost out too long. They need autism trained personnel to help them learn and they need them now. Delay is not an option. Understand their needs, respect the Premier’s commitment and authorize the necessary funding.

Respectfully,

Harold L. Doherty
Fredericton NB

cc. Education Minister Lamrock
Justice Minister & Fredericton-Nashwaaksis MLA Burke
Autism Society New Brunswick

January 14, 2007 Posted by | aba, autism, commitment, education, funding, honor, TA's, teachers, training | 1 Comment

David Celiberti Workshops at UNB Wu Centre Jan 25-26 and Feb 22-24 2007

The UNB-CEL Autism Intervention Training Program is sponsoring two excellent workshops by Dr. David Celiberti, President of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment, (ASAT), and ABA Parent Professional Partnership SIG.

http://extend.unb.ca/prof_dev/programs/ait.php

Core Workshop: Behaviour Management
January 25-26, 2007

This 2-day core workshop will examine how behaviour analysis is a humane but also a practical and effective way to eliminate challenging behaviours. It will examine the functions motivating challenging behaviour, the phases involved in setting up effective interventions through to the development of a written plan. It will also take the participant through specific intervention techniques such as DRO, shaping, escape extinction, response cost, etc.

Instructor: Dr. David Celiberti, BCBA

In 1993 David completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University. David is the Past President of the Autism Special Interest Group (SIG) ABA and now is the President of the ABA Parent Professional Partnership SIG. He is also the President of the Association for Science and Autism Treatment (ASAT). David has authored research articles and consults to programs.

Cost: $347.50 (plus HST) AITP past graduates (open to CS and ASW)
$695 (plus HST) Professionals in the field of Autism

Location: Wu Conference Centre, UNB’s College of Extended Learning

Registration Deadline: January 11, 2007

Behaviour Management Registration Form
The registration form is in .pdf format.

For More Information
Kelly Pickard 506 447-3469 or kpickard@unb.ca

Advanced Workshop: Generalization and Program Writing
February 22-24, 2007

This 3-day advanced workshop will look at the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal) along with specific methods that will increase the success at generalization (such as individualized programs tailored to the target behaviour). The two days on program writing will look at what makes a good program, what an overall program might look like, and will look at specific examples of programs identifying gaps that need to be filled. These sessions will be interactive.

Instructor: Dr. David Celiberti, BCBA

January 13, 2007 Posted by | aba, autism, behavior, education, learning, psychology | Leave a comment