Autism Reality

Inclusion Dogma Seductive but Harmful for Some Autistic Students


UK MP Lee Scott has criticized the UK government for placing politically correct inclusion dogma ahead of the needs of autistic school children. While inclusion sounds good it hasn’t always helped some autistic school children or their classmates.

“Autism needs debated at Westminster

By Sam Adams

A REDBRIDGE MP has criticised the Government for putting political correctness’ before the needs of autistic children.

Lee Scott, MP for Ilford North, secured a special parliamentary debate at Westminster last week, calling for the creation of more special schools, three of which currently exist in Redbridge.

The MP believes the Government’s focus on educational inclusiveness’ has left many youngsters with the condition struggling in mainstream schools when they would develop more effectively in special schools.

He said: “The dogmatic approach of placing all pupils with special needs in mainstream schools has frequently benefited neither them or the children whom they are educated alongside.

“Many of us have at some time been seduced by the theory of inclusion which seems so nice and reasonable and politically correct, but there is clear evidence that it does not work for every autistic child.“

The MP criticised the Government for closing down some special schools, and claimed many mainstream schools are unable to provide the learning support needed by autistic youngsters.

He said: “We have seen seven per cent of special schools closed down since 1997 and in a recent report 44 per cent of teachers in local comprehensives admitted they weren’t confident in teaching kids with autism.”

The MP praised the work of the borough’s current special schools, Hatton School in Clayhall, Newbridge School in Ilford and New Rush Hall School, Hainault, but said provision needed to be expanded further.

Replying for the Government, the Minister for Higher Education and Lifelong Learning Bill Rammell said: “I genuinely welcome this debate and the efforts that the hon. Member for Ilford North has made to bring these important issues to the public’s attention.”

http://tinyurl.com/2zpyse

March 16, 2007 Posted by | autism, autism education, autistic, inclusion, learning, Lee Scott, political correctness, schools, special needs | 1 Comment

The Cat in the Hat is 50 Today



The Cat in the Hat is 50 today and its brilliant creator Theodor Geisel, Dr. Seuss, would be 103 tomorrow, were he still with us. Conor, like so many other children, loves his Dr. Seuss books. Happy Birthday Cat! Thank you Dr. Seuss.

March 1, 2007 Posted by | autism, Conor, Dr. Seuss, learning, reading, The Cat in the Hat | 2 Comments

I Can Read With My Eyes Shut by Conor (and Dr. Seuss)



I sat at the computer a few minutes ago, the first one up and awake in the house, when I heard Conor in the kitchen reading I Can Read With My Eyes Shut by Dr. Seuss. I have mentioned before Conor’s love of Dr. Seuss and his increasing ability to read and will probably do so again. For me it is remarkable that my soon to be 11 year old profoundly autistic son is able to,and wants to, read Dr. Seuss. He gets his Seuss books out and reads them on his own initiative with no prompting or cajoling. Conor’s reading skills were developed through structured Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) intervention. While The Cat in the Hat and I Can Read With My Eyes Shut may not be the reading fare of most 11 year olds, it represents once unthinkable progress for Conor. It didn’t happen without effort or without ABA. But Now Conor can enjoy the playful genius of Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss. And I can enjoy the sound of Conor reading aloud first thing in the morning.

February 11, 2007 Posted by | aba, Applied Behavior Analysis, autism, Dr. Seuss, learning, reading | Leave a comment

David Celiberti Workshops at UNB Wu Centre Jan 25-26 and Feb 22-24 2007

The UNB-CEL Autism Intervention Training Program is sponsoring two excellent workshops by Dr. David Celiberti, President of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment, (ASAT), and ABA Parent Professional Partnership SIG.

http://extend.unb.ca/prof_dev/programs/ait.php

Core Workshop: Behaviour Management
January 25-26, 2007

This 2-day core workshop will examine how behaviour analysis is a humane but also a practical and effective way to eliminate challenging behaviours. It will examine the functions motivating challenging behaviour, the phases involved in setting up effective interventions through to the development of a written plan. It will also take the participant through specific intervention techniques such as DRO, shaping, escape extinction, response cost, etc.

Instructor: Dr. David Celiberti, BCBA

In 1993 David completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University. David is the Past President of the Autism Special Interest Group (SIG) ABA and now is the President of the ABA Parent Professional Partnership SIG. He is also the President of the Association for Science and Autism Treatment (ASAT). David has authored research articles and consults to programs.

Cost: $347.50 (plus HST) AITP past graduates (open to CS and ASW)
$695 (plus HST) Professionals in the field of Autism

Location: Wu Conference Centre, UNB’s College of Extended Learning

Registration Deadline: January 11, 2007

Behaviour Management Registration Form
The registration form is in .pdf format.

For More Information
Kelly Pickard 506 447-3469 or kpickard@unb.ca

Advanced Workshop: Generalization and Program Writing
February 22-24, 2007

This 3-day advanced workshop will look at the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal) along with specific methods that will increase the success at generalization (such as individualized programs tailored to the target behaviour). The two days on program writing will look at what makes a good program, what an overall program might look like, and will look at specific examples of programs identifying gaps that need to be filled. These sessions will be interactive.

Instructor: Dr. David Celiberti, BCBA

January 13, 2007 Posted by | aba, autism, behavior, education, learning, psychology | Leave a comment